Read all kana cards with ease with this template

I’ve found that all kana cards help me with listening ability, because kanji gives away the meaning too easily, while with kana only you’re presented with a pure phonetical rapresentation of the words.

Or, this is what I’ve found to be true in those months of experimentation.
I know that what works for someone can be useless for other people and I don’t want to argue about the usefulness of all kana cards here, but if you think it could be useful for you, or if you wanna give it a try, check out this format.

(Btw I’m not using Anki anymore as a SRS, but I use it to read things all the time. I import something that I want to read, and I break it so that every line of text will be a note in Anki. I use custom decks to read things line per line and if there is something that I want to review later (for example words I’ve forgotten) I mark it.
Obviously this is not a substitute for listening! You need to listen a lot anyway in order to improve your listening ability, but I’ve found that this, in addition to a lot of listening, helps a lot. At least for me.

What makes all kana cards hard to read is that, without kanji, you won’t have a visual tag of word boundaries. With this card format I solved this issue.

EXAMPLE 1

card_blue

Front template:

<div id="sentq"> {{furigana:Reading}} </div>

Styling:

.card {
 font-family: meiryo;
 font-size: 20px;
 text-align: center;
 color: black;
 background-color: white;
}

 div#sentq rb {
 color: white; 
 font-size: 0px;
}

 div#sentq rt {
 display: inline;
 font: inherit;
 color: blue;
}

EXAMPLE 2:

This will alternate between two colors, so that adjiacent compounds will be more readable. This will need JavaScript though.

Front template:

<div id="sentq"> {{furigana:Reading}} </div>

<script>

document.getElementById("sentq").innerHTML = furicolor("sentq");

function furicolor(sentid) {

	var sentqval = document.getElementById(sentid).innerHTML;

	var rtcount = (sentqval.match(/rt/g) || []).length;

	var rtnew = "rt1";

	while(rtcount > 0)
	{
		sentqval = sentqval.replace("<rt>","<" + rtnew + ">");
		sentqval = sentqval.replace("<\/rt>","<\/" + rtnew + ">");

		if(rtnew == "rt1")
		{
			rtnew = "rt2";
		}
		else
		{
			rtnew = "rt1";
		}

		rtcount--;
	}

	return sentqval;
}

</script>

Styling:

.card {
 font-family: meiryo;
 font-size: 20px;
 text-align: center;
 color: black;
 background-color: white;
}

div#sentq rb {
 color: white;
 font-size: 0px;
}

div#sentq rt1, div#sentq rt2 {
 display: inline;
 font: inherit;
}

div#sentq rt1 {
 color: blue;
}

div#sentq rt2 {
 color: red;
}

Hope this helps!

This is my template. In addition, if you make a word bold, it will underline it of its color (but you need to bold the white space too, in case of words with furigana in square brakets; check the last image)

Front template:

<div id="sentq"> {{furigana:Reading}} </div>

<script>

document.getElementById("sentq").innerHTML = furicolor("sentq");

function furicolor(sentid) {

	var sentqval = document.getElementById(sentid).innerHTML;

	var rtcount = (sentqval.match(/rt/g) || []).length;

	var rtnew = "rt1";

	while(rtcount > 0)
	{
		sentqval = sentqval.replace("<rt>","<" + rtnew + ">");
		sentqval = sentqval.replace("<\/rt>","<\/" + rtnew + ">");

		if(rtnew == "rt1")
		{
			rtnew = "rt2";
		}
		else
		{
			rtnew = "rt1";
		}

		rtcount--;
	}

	return sentqval;
}

</script>

Styling:

.card {
 font-family: meiryo;
 font-size: 20px;
 text-align: center;
 color: #dcdcdc;
 background-color: #1e1e1e;
}

div#sentq rb {
 color: #1e1e1e;
 font-size: 0px;
}

div#sentq rt1, div#sentq rt2 {
 display: inline;
 font: inherit;
}

div#sentq rt1 {
 color: #4ec9b0;
}

div#sentq rt2 {
 color: #569cd6;
}

b {
 font-weight: normal;
}

div#sentq b {
 border-bottom: 1px dashed #808080;
}

div#sentq b rt1 {
 border-bottom: 1px dashed #317d6e;
}

div#sentq b rt2 {
 border-bottom: 1px dashed #37658a;
}

card_scheme

How to make a word bold:

card_bold

When I want to practice words purely phonetically, for listening practice, I use romaji. I look at the romaji, then I say what it means in English, then flip the card over where I can see the kanji & kana as well as the English translation.

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Here’s the khatsumoto post on this topic from 2008.

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Exactly! xD

Here are other opinions from other people related to this topic:

“Another motivation was that I found my Chinese listening relatively weak . But literacy is crucial and I love text. So, what this does is both use and build strength in both writing and listening at the same time. Given a phonetic representation of Chinese, you have to produce the text (and of course in order to produce the text correctly, you have to have understood the phonetic representation). In that sense it’s like taking a dictation.
Could you do this for Japanese sentences/phrases, too? My first answer was actually, “no”. But Momoko said “yes”. And after trying it, I would say, “yes”, too. So, yes. You definitely can, and in fact I would heartily recommend you try, because I think it would do wonders for your kanji production skills and your listening comprehension skills (remember, there are no subtitles in real life ).”
Chinese Project Notes 8: Ch-Ch-Changes + Stuff That Applies to Japanese, Too

“Although a written word can help us remember what we’re hearing, it can also interfere with our direct association of sound with meaning .
You hear a sound and you immediately associate that sound with its corresponding semantic meaning .
But when you’re using written text, the association works more like this: [ check the drawing ]
In this last scenario here [ when you learn a word by reading ], you associate the written word ‘house’ with its meaning (a picture of a house) but then the actual sound of the word is the final association .
This means that if you’re in a conversation, the sound association has taken a backseat and you’ll struggle to immediately associate it with its meaning when somebody says it to you or you’ll struggle to recall it and use it in speech.
The ideal that we’re all aiming for (assuming we want to be fluent speakers) is of course the first sequence:
The immediate association of sound with meaning and vice versa.
This is where whatever it is I’m hearing has an immediate semantic meaning attached to it without a written representation.
In other words, if I say the word ‘dog’ to you, you instantly register that sound with mental imagery of a dogyou don’t think back to a written word and then draw a connection from that.”
How Important Is Reading For Learning To Speak a Language? Not Very. Here’s Why…

“Did you ever made flash-cards that will only play the audio and force you to recognize the word? Does that sound useful to you? Yes, I do think that sounds useful altough I’ve not done it. I think in Japanese particularly that might be useful because that would be a way to test yourself on the word comprehension without getting hints from the kanji .”
Q+A #4: Listening Practice, Grammar Resources

“Knowing kanji almost feels like cheating when it comes to learning new words since they give you pronunciation and meaning most of the time.”
The Snowball Effect in Japanese | Vlog #28

"- I’m a fan of sentence cards as described in this AJATT post — kana sentence on the front , standard kanji/kana sentence plus L1 translation on the back. *** Focusing on listening while secondarily reading seems quite powerful. (Does anyone else agree on this point?)

When you learn from listening , the sound is what you recognize not some random order of hiragana or katakana. You’ll build a direct association between the sound and the meaning . For reading, you can just read the hiragana/katakana out loud and you know what it means. Or if it’s kanji, you’ll have to learn to associate the kanji to the sound. The nicest part is that you’ll always know whether you remembered it correctly because you intuitively know how the word should sound like ."
Your Methods of Study

Other links:
Idahosa Ness - Learning by Eye vs. Learning by Ear: Which is better? [EN] - PG 2017