2021 Goals?

Pretty much the title.

Anything specific to Japanese in your new year’s resolutions? Read your first book, go to Japan, take a class, try the JLPT or Kantei, finish some Anki deck, etc.

It’s always interesting to revisit these threads :slight_smile:

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I mentioned this in my study log, but my only Japanese goal for the year is to keep going at it. Nothing specific or grand, just keep enjoying the things I enjoy and learn what comes along with it.

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The biggest change for me this year is ramping up my speaking practice. Start this Thursday with italki. Nervous but I think it will really move the needle forward for me.

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Mostly reading for me, I think I need to set my books target lower but this time with more ‘quality’ – for example, finishing a book, reading more wordy content.

My listening still lags behind, so I guess I should really start ploughing my way through more JP subtitled (or not) content.

Since I don’t know my N3 result, the first goal will be to pass N3! Then a real attempt at N2 at the end of the year. Right now, just the name is rather daunting.

Speaking always seems to be the final hurdle がんばれ!

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Thanks. For listening if you asked me 6 months ago I was suffering there as well. I spent the last 6 months doing a ton of podcasts and finally am making serious progress. So for me podcasts at the right level was the trick. Nihongo Con Teppei. Before that I was trying harder stuff and it was slow going.

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For this year I would like to read at least 52 Japanese novels and write reviews for each one.

Also am planning on moving to Japan in a few years and would like to work on saving as much money as a can before I move.

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I did this a couple of years back (but without the review-writing part!) – for me it was a challenging but achievable goal. My recommendation is to work backwards from the annual target to define a benchmark for how many pages you need to aim to read every day – I figured a book was on average about 350 pages, and 52 books is one a week, so I knew I had to read at least 50 pages a day. For me a daily goal was psychologically more useful, and it gave immediate feedback on whether I was on target for the overall goal. I also found the Tadoku contests good for motivation to put in occasional bursts of more intensive reading, which I needed to catch back up from drifting below my target daily average sometimes.

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Thanks for the tips! Yeah having page goals is really useful. I work 12-16 hour shifts 3 times a week so have an idea of the average number of pages I have to read on my days off are super important.

Yes! I really like using Tadoku as a tracker for pages. Its really fun and motivating to see everyone else trying hard and putting in the time as well.

What is your reading like now?

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I can read most modern fiction fairly easily without a dictionary (which doesn’t mean I know all the words in it!). There are definitely some books that I make much slower progress through than others, though – I have some historical fiction which is a huge slog because of all the unfamiliar personal and place names and other words.

It’s hard to say what effect my book-a-week year had – it certainly didn’t cause a huge step change in either reading fluency or speed that I’ve noticed, though the total volume read must have helped my vocab, etc. I think that’s because it was really just putting in more time reading rather than having some breakthrough in reading speed – my “average-to-good year” before that year was about 20-25 books, and that hasn’t changed.

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My goal is to just read more and do it consistently. I was able to reach 150 pages for the Jan tadoku, which was a first time thing for me. I need to focus on more grammar and vocab along the way as well.

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My goal is to finish reading a complete Japanese book intended for native speakers. I am around 140 pages done in a 200 page novel so I’m almost there.

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I finished the 200 page novel I was reading! This is my first compete book intended for native Japanese speakers.

I wonder if I should take a few weeks off from reading to drill myself on the vocabulary I had to look up in the dictionary before embarking on another one of the author’s books. I looked them up in Akebi so I can easily make an Anki deck.

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I finished the 200 page novel I was reading! This is my first compete book intended for native Japanese speakers.

Nice one! :tada: :tada:

What was the book? And how difficult did you find it?

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The book I read was

It was medium-difficult. I really enjoyed it. And I learned a lot of grammar/vocabulary.

By the way, I still don’t know how to translate the title! Can anyone help please?

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Well, I tried using Anki for a day or so…it’s so depressing and boring and dull I think I’ll just jump in to the next book by the same author! I prefer reading over drilling myself in vocabulary.

I guess I’ll just have to hope I can pick up vocabulary naturally as I go along and look up words.

I’ve started to read this one in the series. Again, I can’t figure out what the title means! Can someone help, please?

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If you like those (I do too), the good news is there’s plenty of them in the series (that first one you read is #23!), and they don’t have a strong cross-volume plotline so you can read them in any order.

On the titles: お年ごろ means a young woman who’s of an age to fall in love and (in the traditional way of thinking) get married. So the title of that one is something like “The vampire is a young lady” (it’s the first book in the series, and the title is putting front and centre the premise of the series, ie “high school girl who’s a vampire”).

For the other, 幸いあれ isn’t a phrase I’d come across before, but I found a dictionary entry saying it’s kind of like a toast, a well-wishing; “be happy” is the EDICT translation, though that feels maybe not quite formal enough. Anyway, “Be happy, Miss Vampire” or more freely “Here’s to you, Miss Vampire” is about the sense of it.

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Thanks!

I was sort of close with the title to #23. The only thing I could think of was that “are” is the imperative of “aru” and means “let there be”, so I thought it meant “let there be happiness for Miss Vampire.”

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That’s my dream! :laughing:

Going off your (neglected :laughing:) study log, I’d guess these are readable for someone around/above N3 level.

Another thought, instead of Anki you might just want to use your dictionary apps flash cards. I recall Steve Kauffman would just quickly go through flashcards and not care about success/fail. It was more about refreshing his memory :thinking:

I might have to set an additional 2021 goal: delete Anki. That will be towards the end of the year though!